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upworthy:

In 1961, This Was Something ‘Nice’ People Didn’t Talk About

In 1961, Shirley MacLaine and Audrey Hepburn starred in “The Children’s Hour.” While censorship guidelines at the time of filming didn’t outright prohibit the mention of homosexuality, it was widely known the topic was not something that was acceptable to discuss on the big screen.

At 2:20, you’ll see the pain that came with Shirley MacLaine’s character’s struggle. It was one of the first movies to broach this topic, so you might be very surprised to hear what she says at 2:50. Susie Bright’s insight at the end painfully illustrates the things our society still needs to work on.

gailsimone:

This was my hair-raising post for READ A COMIC IN PUBLIC DAY a couple years ago.
It took a half an hour to get my hair to do that, and yet, this is what it looks like NATURALLY if I don’t want it to! 
READ A COMIC IN PUBLIC DAY is good fun, show your photos, everyone!
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gailsimone:

This was my hair-raising post for READ A COMIC IN PUBLIC DAY a couple years ago.

It took a half an hour to get my hair to do that, and yet, this is what it looks like NATURALLY if I don’t want it to! 


READ A COMIC IN PUBLIC DAY is good fun, show your photos, everyone!

mentalflossr:

Back before rigid cardboard containers, cigarettes were only sold in soft packs. Distributors needed something to keep the packs from bending, so cards were added as stiffeners. W.D.& H.O.Wills started a trend of adding simple illustrations in the late 1880s, thus transforming the cards into collectables. A popular series called “Did you know?” posed intriguing questions and answered them on the back of the card (they were like old fashioned Big Questions).

Did You Know? 25 Tidbits from Vintage Cigarette Cards

theacademy:

Alfred Hitchcock’s definition of Happiness

"A clear horizon, nothing to worry about on your plate. Only things that are creative and not destructive. That’s within yourself, within me. I can’t bear quarreling I can’t bear feelings between people. I think hatred is wasted energy. It’s all nonproductive. I’m very sensitive. A sharp word said by say a person who has a temper if they’re close to me, hurts me for days. I know we’re only human, we do go in for these various emotions, call them negative emotions, but when all these are removed and you can look forward and the road is clear ahead and now you’re going to create something. I think that’s as happy as I would ever want to be."

How Movies Synchronize the Brains of an Audience | Science | WIRED

theacademy:

"The whole trick of film making is hacking those parts of the brain that keep people entertained,” Iron Man director Jon Favreau told the crowd.

firstbook:

Today is the last day of the #ISupportMalala Twitter Campaign.

These last three weeks, in honor of the recent release of I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up For Education and Changed the World, Little, Brown Young Readers have donated a book to children in need every time a tweet to @lbkids with the hashtag #ISupportMalala was posted.

We hope to have hit 200,000 donated books by the end of today! Thank you to all who sent out 1 tweet to donate 1 book!

There’s still time to show your support of an education for all - just write your own #ISupportMalala tweet to @lbkids or copy & paste the message below into your Twitter status update before 11:59 p.m. EST tonight!

#ISupportMalala! Tweet @lbkids with the hashtag and 1 book will be donated @firstbook to a child in need. http://iammalala.pgtb.me/c4s4rd

There is something of value in books that give the reader pleasure, from romance and young adult fiction to other genres — I mean, we all love crime, right? — and there is something to be discovered in reading these books and talking about these books. People who need to self-identify as literary could stand to learn from the bulk of these works, regarding how to entertain and beguile the reader while changing their life.
Why Book Criticism and Literary Culture Needs a Poptimist Revolution (via flavorpill)
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